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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Arty European flicks like this were catnip for '60s American beatniks & film-buffs. Those were the days when students flocked to see head-scratchers like L'Avventura and Last Year at Marienbad... Garcia's affection for this film was lasting, though.

One site says:
"It was in 1965 that Garcia and two friends stumbled upon Polish director Wojciech Has' The Saragossa Manuscript at Centro Cedar Cinema in North Beach, and after that night Garcia always said that it was his favorite film... In fact, Garcia was so enamored of The Saragossa Manuscript that he offered the Pacific Film Archive the funding necessary to purchase a print of the film for their holdings, with the only caveat being that he would be allowed to watch it any time he wanted."

Not only that, when a complete print was found in the '90s, Garcia started to finance its restoration, but died before it was finished; Scorsese & Coppola provided the rest of the funds.
So your being able to watch it on DVD is partly due to Garcia's efforts.

He was more of a film buff than Dead fans realize; another movie that tickled him was the mystical 1960 Mexican film Macario.
In the 1980s, Garcia even planned to direct his own adaptation of Vonnegut's novel Sirens of Titan. "I'm not going to become a filmmaker as a career; I'll do it like Jean Cocteau - do a couple of tasty movies and that's it."
Nothing came of his plans, of course.

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Poster: Reade Date: Apr 15, 2011 5:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

He also really liked Alejandro Jodorowsky's 'El Topo,' as one might expect given it hails from the 'Acid Western' genre.
A sequel to El Topo is said to be coming out in 2012.

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Poster: 219mid Date: Apr 15, 2011 8:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

It would be a shame if someone who might be pleased by this excellent movie was discouraged from doing so by the unenthusiastic nature of the commentary. The great surrealist Luis Bunuel is quoted in his biography saying that The Saragossa Manuscript is the movie he himself had watched the most (three times). If you're open to unusual art, you might be gratified to watch it. I found it an immense amount of fun. Those people back there in 1965 might have been on to something.

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Poster: ned the head Date: Apr 15, 2011 9:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

I screen captured parts of the movie for some wallpapers.

edit- Speaking of movies, what about Atlas Shrugged coming out today?

This post was modified by ned the head on 2011-04-15 16:15:22

Attachment: cap003.bmp

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

It does seem Grateful Dead-ish
(the art, that is, not Atlas Shrugged)

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

I saw a short interview with the financier/producer last night. I do wonder why it's never been filmed before. I don't think it's Rands stringent form of libertarianism, but maybe those 1200 pages!

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 4:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

His interest in Sirens of Titans is endearing. I loved that book when I was a teenager. I read it again a few years ago and couldn't recall why I was so enthralled by it.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Do you find that you keep books on the shelf because when you look at them it reminds you how much you enjoyed them? And not because you might read them again, because, if you're honest, you know that you probably never will.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Funny I'm just the opposite. I *do* re-read things. OTOH, I don't usually want to read the same copy. If it doesn't look new I have to go buy a new one. Very strange and wasteful, I know.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

In all honesty I can think of very few things that I reread (although it does happen now and then) because there are just so many new things to deal with, and my time here is limited.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

I have a few books I read about every 10 years or so (as it seems to be working out).
Graves, I, Claudius & Claudius The God.
Foote, The Civil War.
Hamilton, Mythology.
Tuchman, Guns of August.

But, I know I'll never read most of my books again. So I stick things in my them. Kid drawings (the really good one's and you can tell), cards, tics, other things. It's actually in my will that my 'library' is not to be broken up. One of those other things I've been putting in books is little mementos of family history going back some time. I have a love letter from my grandfather to my grandmother and you know what, the dude could write! A severe 1913 Sunday best on family photo. And all sorts of weird little things too. I began marking and dating what new stuff goes in since '05 and the stuff I come across. There is some unusual/rare paper money that I haven't been able to find since I put it in the book. And I've looked. A few rolling papers that would have come in handy once or twice.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Yeah, I know, but I can't take it :) I'm an old dog and can't learn very many new tricks. New ideas just confuse me ... probably this is why I'd rather listen to music, lately.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

How much time do you spend listening to new music (I mean new to you not recently recorded necessarily) as opposed to sticking with the tried and tested that you know will hit the spot?

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Depends what you mean. Keep in mind I only re-discovered the Grateful Dead coming on about 2 years ago now. So it is not as if I am one of those people who has been listening to nothing but the Grateful Dead since, you know, 1975. Do I sound a bit defensive? :) Also, prior to around this time I never really listened to anything because I had no life, I was wrapped up in my kid and then in my job.

So yeah, I admit I'm not exactly on the cutting edge, I'm just trying to keep sane. I have stress :) actually, I have some pretty serious stress. And as long as I am whining, I had a car accident a couple of weeks ago. I'm not injured badly, but I'm wicked stiff and sore. So don't pick on me :)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:38am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Just looking for the facts, ma'am, just the facts.

:-)


Sorry to hear about the accident - and glad to hear that you escaped it relatively unscathed. You know, we make these connections here, yet almost any one of us could drop off the big board because of some tragedy and the rest of us would never know what had happened, just be left wondering now and then 'whatever happened to old whatsisname?'

Anyway, I wasn't being accusatory or anything, what you listen to is what you listen to. Even though my first Dead show was in 74 I only saw them a handful of times and never had access to bootlegs (the Dick's Picks series was a revelation - whole shows to listen to!) and then I found this place a few years ago. I'm still playing catch up. But at the same time there are a lot of other people I want to listen to as well. I'm doomed, I tell you, doomed.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

>You know, we make these connections here, yet almost any one of us could drop off the big board because of some tragedy and the rest of us would never know what had happened, just be left wondering now and then 'whatever happened to old whatsisname?'

Thanks, yeah I've thought that, too.

Public service announcement: Wear your seatbelt. If I hadn't been wearing mine, I'd have definitely gone through the windshield and really might have disappeared, to join some Great Forum in the Sky.

Also, stay off the New Jersey turnpike if you possibly can. Not a problem for you, I guess, Rob :)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:04pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

My only connection with the New Jersey Turnpike is via Paul Simon.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Well, you're fortunate. It's the road rage capitol of the western hemisphere.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Worse than the Beltway? Though on the Beltway I don't think it's road rage. I think it's everyone trying to show how aggressive and driven (ha) and DC-ish they are. "Oh, you have your blinker on, do you? You want to get in? Well, just watch me filibuster you with a ton of metal here! No one gets ahead of ME!"

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Apr 15, 2011 1:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Wish that bike I had been riding back in 87 had a seatbelt. Kind of role reversal. I went through the windshield, allright, just from the outside-in. Nothing like a hospital bed for 3 months. Had tickets for the whole Spring Tour that got turned into Miracles for some lucky folks. First show post-trauma was Red Rocks that Summer. Nice way to get back on the bus.

Very happy to hear you came out of it relatively unscathed.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 2:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Thank you :) Oy, my accident hardly compares to yours if you spent 3 months in the hospital!!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Hmmm, missed this the first time thru...was glad to see Poles and Micks were defended quite well, and we were off to the races, even if I checked out at the starting gate, BUT also glad I followed thru to the end to find you are okay. Of course, you've got a long way to go to catch up with me and all my ailments, so mend and get back up to speed quickly.

Had to chime in on the book front as I am with Rob; but of course, most of mine are historical works, and they don't have the appeal of novels and the like til too many yrs have passed (don't get me wrong, some are epic, far more exciting and difficult to put down than fiction, etc). But, the collector in me loves to look at them, and of course, they are organized in various ways (chronological, genre, etc.), but what gives me the most joy is when someone asks "what's the best...Korean Conflict?" or "I need a summary...the Dust Bowl" or "fire history of the West", blah, blah, blah, and I can go to a shelf and pull one.

Of course, that happens about once a yr, but it's still a nice feeling. And not so absolutely egotistical as it seems.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 16, 2011 1:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Thanks WT, I am fine, but I just don't spring back so fast anymore. It's just a few bumps and bruises, but I'll probably be complaining for weeks. Arrgh! Well, as they say, getting old sucks, but it's better than the alternative.

Funny the book thread got me looking at my shelves and finding all kinds of things I want to re-read.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 16, 2011 3:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Ha--you're still a spring chicken when the "bounce back" just takes a bit longer! It's when rather than a "bounce back" it's "try to drop below baseline as little as possible"...but enough whining on my part. Like SDH, I was hit by a car or two while on a bike, and like you, I recall being sore in places that didn't seem to make sense, that I'd never felt before, and decided it was the overall stretching, bouncing and biochemical changes in muscles not directly impacted that just resulted in ~ 2 wks of real pain.

Take it easy!

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Wow, I'm glad you're OK there!!! If I hadn't been wearing a seatbelt when I was 20 or so, that would have been it. I recall how the seatbelt held as the car spun and flipped on its roof and crunched like a tin can and the windshield shattered in slow motion. (Time really does slow down.) Definitely a lesson I'll never forget. I was black and blue but OK, thanks to the seat belt and some seriously good luck. That must have been nasty scary. I hope you've had time to treat yourself to something nice, for body and soul :-)

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 2:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Thanks :) It was terrifying, otherwise no damage. The guy who hit me, well his car is another story ...

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Yes. I'm a bibliophile. I bet you are too.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

You win that bet. But the odds were short.

:-)

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 15, 2011 11:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Very short. A two foot put.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

I had the same experience. I keep looking for It.

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:44am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Maybe Jerry was kind of always adolescent at heart.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Apr 15, 2011 2:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

I do get kind of nostalgic for the days when artists of all kinds were all about breaking boundaries and pushing the envelope, and it really meant something, to the artists and their audiences. How can you push the envelope now? Sigh.

Here's a film festival idea: Jerry's Favorite Films! (Just don't hold it on 4/20, LOL.) Of course, on second thought, that would probably draw maybe, oh, five people. But an online list of films that influenced or were favorites of various Folks of Interests (like Jerry) would be fun.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

I don't remember anyone asking Jerry for his favorite films, actually. Maybe somewhere.
He was a devoted comics collector, too - especially EC comics of the '50s - but I don't think he ever spoke about that!
For that matter, he was very well-read in general; but that side of him didn't really surface in public.

David Kemper said, "He read a lot, and he loved to talk about what he'd been reading. Jerry was interested in the most diverse stuff. You could pick any subject, and I guarantee he knew more about it than you did."

Ozzie Ahlers said that on tour, "He had almost no clothing. He'd just brought two suitcases, almost entirely filled with science fiction books. He loved science fiction, or as he called it, science reality. He was an avid fan and anything that I had read he had read twice and all the books surrounding it. He was a voracious reader."

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Apr 15, 2011 10:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

Do you push the envelope or stumble upon it, then push?
AR, you aren't the Nietzsche of the art world are you? Art is dead? (Is that why we are here on a site obsessively listening to music made a minimum of 15 years age, more likely 40ish?)

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Apr 15, 2011 12:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Saragossa Manuscript

The people who really push the envelope are the ones who don't believe that they're actually inside one.